From the Blogroll XXX: Next to Abnormal?

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At 2am Theatre, David J. Loehr schools the uninitiated and recalcitrant about social media. Failure to learn or to adhere begets professional paralysis and aesthetic KP duty. Meanwhile, there’s a transcript of this week’s live chat and Tricia Mead’s assertion that we “price everything wrong in the theater” (or at least in Chicago — the piece doesn’t deal with the constrictions of the Actors’ Equity Showcase contract in New York) as well as more Twitter tut-tutting and tutoring from Dennis Baker.

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Yet it was Alli Houseworth’s provocative “The ‘Race’ Street Team and the Morality of Arts Marketing” that rankled. Oh, dear — I didn’t know there was morality in arts marketing. If marketing can be defined as the art of persuading people to buy what they didn’t know they wanted (a moral question itself), then I’d argue that arts marketing isn’t any more or less moral just because it sells the arts. Houseworth’s piece assails the “street team” working by the TKTS booth in Duffy Square (not Times Square) to sell tickets for the David Mamet play Race on Broadway.

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The “team,” she writes…

is comprised of women of various races who wear short, strapless, red sequined dresses (like the one the “victim” wore in the play) and who hand flyers to passersby.

Houseworth acknowledges she “did not speak to any of the girls,” but imagines “it would be quite difficult for these promoters to tell passersby on the streets of Times Square that they are promoting a David Mamet play, what a David Mamet play means, and how this one adds race to the more typical gender conflict that arises in Mamet’s plays.”

Later on, writes:

….arts marketers are not in the business of selling cigarettes or cars or toilet paper. We’re in the business of selling art. And, theatre is distinguishable from all other arts because it is the one medium in which there is a direct expression of the human condition. That’s what we do – we put people on stage and watch them have a relationship with one another, and with us. If we wanted to just make money we would have gone into advertising.

Most arts marketers do their job because they care about it, because they have a passion for the art. However, marketing for the arts carries with it a moral imperative that does not come with marketing products for Philip Morris or Budweiser. In addition to being advocates for our theatres and our plays, we as arts marketers must be advocates for the human condition.

A few notes on this. First, theater is not the “one medium in which there is a direct expression of the human condition.” With all due respect, that is an ignorant comment. Would composers not assert, with powerful reason, that their work is a “direct expression of the human condition”? Is the dance not a “direct expression of the human condition”? Is the history of visual art since, say, the Renaissance — painting, sculpture — devoid of any example of the “direct expression of the human condition”? Is the function of architecture — the experience of space — not at all a “direct expression of the human condition”? Would fiction writers and poets agree that their work has no “direct expression of the human condition”? Does opera fall short when it comes to the “direct expression of the human condition”? Certainly all these arts must be marketed, too, no? If we’re going to discuss the morality of arts marketing, I humbly suggest remembering that the theater is not the center of the aesthetic universe, but one of its well-warmed planets.

At 99 Seats, J. Holtham gave a hat tip to a certain blogger that pointed everyone to a discussion involving, among others, Lisa Timmel at the Huntington Theatre in Boston about new plays.

At A Poor Player, Tom Loughlin saluted Craig Noel, the founding director of the Old Globe, who recently passed on, and added some thoughts regarding Charles Isherwood’s “Odd Man Out” piece in the New York Times.

At A Rehearsal Room of One’s Own, Mariah MacCarthy offered a series of important messages, then offered a very important message about feminism — what it is and what it isn’t, or perhaps, more precisely, what it should be.

At Adam Szymkowicz’s blog, Adam Szymkowicz adds to his extraordinary series of Q&As with contemporary and emerging American playwrights. These include Emily Schwend, Jerrod Bogard, Anton Dudley (the CFR’s interview with him will run next week), Les Hunter, Greg Keller, Beau Willimon, my dear colleague Kathleen Warnock, and Heidi Darchuk.

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At Adaumbelle’s Quest, Adam Rothenberg’s most recent interview features Broadway and film vet Rory O’Malley.

At Adventures in the Endless Pursuit of Entertainment, Sarah B. covers some recollections of her first time at the opera, and some of her adventures at Sweeney Todd at Signature Theatre in Arlington, VA. And then there are the windows at Bergdorf Goodman, which are feeling a little Sondheim, too. Plus: the Frog and Peach Theatre Company’s revival of Macbeth.

At the African-American Playwrights Exchange, there are tons of great posts: on Michael Oatman’s Eclipse: The War Between Pac and B.I.G. and Cleveland’s Karamu House (thank you, New York Times); on the ubiquitous Mwalim; on Stephanie Berry’s The Last Fall, running at Crossroads Theatre in New Brunswick, NJ; and a plug for DeeWorks Live!

At Americans for the Arts’ Artsblog, there is always tremendous discussion going on — much of it tackling issues that the mainstream media ought to look at and far too rarely does. In the last week, these include: Ebony McKinney’s advice on getting organized; Ian David Moss’ view on The Future of Leadership; Keely Saye’s exhortation to ask a great question; Liz Bartolomeo’s behind-the-scenes look at Arts Advocacy Day in Washington, DC; and Alix Refshauge’s look at something local: Citizen Spartanburg. Also: a green paper on the future of state arts agencies and Constance White asked if public art administrators are curators.

At An Angry White Guy in Chicago, the angry Don Hall is still angry, or at least he offers what amounts to a riposte of Alli Houseworth’s beating of the drum over arts marketing. Hall’s point: Your Marketing Doesn’t Matter. Hall also has a video that makes you want to smack around those violent, anti-American, spitting teabaggers; reviews a play about Emily Dickinson; reviews the Steppenwolf revival of Beckett’s Endgame; offers additional invective on the teabagger phenomenon; and offers some additional choice words on arts marketing and how to make money doing theater. Also: a nice slam against Texas governor-bot Rick Perry.

At Artistic Discourse, Zack Hayhurst will update soon.

At Arts Counseling, Mark Robinson is moving over to his own arts consulting firm, Thinking Practice, and the blog that goes along with it is here.

At Arts Marketing, Chad M. Bauman will update soon.

At Arts, Culture and Creative Economy, Gary Steuer, chief cultural officer for Philadelphia and director of the Office of Arts, Culture and the Creative Economy, offers two views of Arts Advocacy Day in Washington, DC — one here and one here, the latter focusing on the testimony of Brig. Gen. Bivens, which we at the CFR commented on here.

At Artsopolis, there is coverage of Ballet San Jose, a rehearsal of Duo Ethos and Dirty Blonde at San Jose Stage Company.

At Artsy Schmartsy, Jonathan West wants $20 from you — now. For December. Click to find out why.

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At Backyart, there was a free writing workshop on Saturday. Did you miss it? Silly… Plus: how to get Overstimulated.

At Between Productions, Robert Cashill offers a RIP for film editor Dede Allen.

At Blank New World, Diane Snyder gives a shout-out to two Off-Broadway shows: The Irish Curse and The Temperamentals.

At Blogging by Arwen, Arwen Lowbridge explains why appeals letters are written all wrong (superb post) and writes about the Volunteer Income Tax Preparation program (VITA).

At Blogging by Numbers, Corinne Furness and Charlie Whitworth will update soon.

At Blogomatopoeia, Karl Miller will update soon.

At Blue Avocado, Jan Masaoka offers instruction on a “nonprofit business model statement,” which “spells out” an organization’s “economic drivers”; Robin Erickson considers the possibilities of flextime in the nonprofit workplace; the Rockefeller Foundation and the New York Times receive a major raking over the coals for poor press coverage; and more on this raking over the coals — they’re called the Just Awards — can be found here.

At the Brennan Center for Justice, Liza Goitein and Emily Berman examine the withdrawal of Dawn Johnsen as President Obama’s nominee to head the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel; there is a report on a new law signed in Iowa that “requires a majority of the board of directors to vote in the affirmative to authorize political expenditures from the corporation’s coffers”; Erika Wood writes a piece on the comeback of Jim Crow in the Virginia of Gov. Bob McDonnell; a review of David Remnick’s new book about Barack Obama; a review of Julian Zelizer’s Arsenal of Democracy: The Politics of National Security from World War II to the War on Terrorism ; a Q&A with Gretchen Rubin on her book, The Happiness Project; Jeff Shesol’s plug for his own book on the court-packing plan of President Franklin D. Roosevelt; a Q&A between Eric Alterman and Garry Wills’ regarding Wills’ new book, Bomb Power: The Modern Presidency and the National Security State; a Q&A with the aforementioned Remnick; and Emily Berman’s think piece on a subject we ought to be paying more attention to:

A federal appeals court today heard arguments in Amnesty v. Blair, a legal challenge to the constitutionality of recent amendments to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA). The suit, brought on behalf of attorneys and human rights, labor, legal, and media organizations whose work requires them to engage in sensitive communications located outside the United States, claims that the surveillance of international communications authorized by the FISA amendments violates the First and Fourth Amendments.

The issue before the appeals court was not, however, whether surveillance carried out under the statute is constitutional. Instead, the plaintiffs were faced with the task of establishing standing-showing that they had been injured by the statute-thus granting them the right to challenge the statute in court. The lower court accepted the government’s argument that, because the plaintiffs could not definitively show that they had been subjected to surveillance under the statute, any harm they might have suffered was too remote…

At Broadway and Me, the popular Jan will update soon.

At Broadway Abridged, Gil Varod responds to the idea of a Dances with Wolves musical in four words.

At Broadway Bullet, check out podcast number 406.

At Broadway Mouth, the anonymous blogger hasn’t posted since January. No more mouth?

At Butts in the Seats, Joe offers an interesting post on the brain and creativity (we apologize for being reductive — the post is very intriguing); the site-specific Celebrity Project opened (and there are photos!); and Joe is China-bound.

At the Carnegie Council, the argument emerges (re-emerges) for a comprehensive Israeli-Palestinian settlement if only the U.S. would push it, and incentivize both sides. (We’re unconvinced — the Israelis are intractable.) Also: there is an interview with Angolan activist Rafael Marques; a think piece on what government can learn from new research on well-being; and another piece that considers the irony of nuclear weapons.

At CollisionWorks, Ian W. Hill returns to New York and gets right back to work — making work.

At Community Perspectives: Riffing with John Clinton Eisner, there is this month’s guest essayist: Colin Greer.

At Createquity, Ian David Moss publishes his “Future of Leadership” piece (noted as well up above under the blog of Americans for the Arts), and it contains this gem:

But even as we honor and benefit from the contributions of the Boomer and Silent generations, we also must face the fact that there are some forms of wisdom that are not transferable from previous generations. Our world has changed dramatically just in the time that Generation Y has been alive, and the rate of change only keeps increasing. Certain ways of thinking, communicating, and organizing ourselves are proving to be a better fit with the past than they are with the future. So as we develop new strategies to support the next generation of arts leaders as they begin this leg of the journey, we need to keep in mind that simply talking about where we’ve been will provide an incomplete map of the road ahead.

My question is this: Are the Boomer and Silent generations aware of this? At one point will they — what’s the word? acquiesce? — to the idea that there will be a generation of leaders to follow them?

At Creating Theater, Bill will update shortly.

At the Critical Condition, Mark Blankenship is not taking responsibility for the volcano in Iceland, where he was making a documentary. There is, however, cute coverage of the current “soda tax” debate in New York; and Doug Strassler gives some good old southern love to the late Dixie Carter.

At CultureBot, there is coverage of Molly Rice’s The Saints Tour in the West Village; and this information about The A.W.A.R.D. Show 2010-11, which we are taking the liberty of helping to promote here as well:

The Joyce Theater Foundation
presents
The A.W.A.R.D. Show! 2010-2011
Artists With Audiences Responding to Dance
In partnership with
The Dance Center of Columbia College Chicago
REDCAT (Los Angeles)
Dance Affiliates (Philadelphia)
ODC Theater (San Francisco)
and
On the Boards (Seattle)

The Joyce Theater Foundation is pleased to announce that for The A.W.A.R.D. Show! 2010-2011 it will partner with five presenting organizations across the country: The Dance Center of Columbia College Chicago, REDCAT (Los Angeles), Dance Affiliates (Philadelphia), ODC Theater (San Francisco) and On the Boards (Seattle). The A.W.A.R.D. Show! was created in 2005 by choreographer Neta Pulvermacher in response to a need for a lab-like space in which working dance artists can engage in an open dialogue with the audience about their work. It is dedicated to nurturing new work, discussion, exploration, creativity and the free exchange of ideas, thoughts and opinions.

Each of the series — in New York City, Chicago, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, San Francisco and Seattle — will present the work of 12 promising contemporary choreographers. Three preliminary evenings will feature the work of four choreographers per night. Each dance piece will be 12-15 minutes of a completed work, excerpt or work-in-progress. After each performance, a moderated artist and audience discussion will take place, followed by an audience vote to select a finalist to perform on the fourth and final night of the series. Each night, the audience and the artists will be invited to a post-performance reception to encourage further informal dialogue about the work. On the final night in each city, a panel of experts in dance and other cultural arts fields, along with the audience, will choose the winner of the award.

The first place winner in each of the six participating cities will receive a $10,000 cash award. The two runners-up in each city will receive $1,000. The winners and runners-up will use these awards toward the creation of new dance work. This expansion into Chicago, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, San Francisco and Seattle is made possible by a generous grant from The Boeing Company.

Meanwhile, if you don’t know Twenty-Five Cent Opera of San Francisco, you should be looking at Brooklyn; there is a bit of Technoshamanism (huh) at the Center for Performance Research; the Fusebox Festival in Austin, TX; a new Housing Works auction here in New York; new solo pieces coming up in May at the Baryshnikov Arts Center; Big Art Group’s new piece at the Abrons Center down on the Lower East Side; some Lecoq training available for the Lecoqy; and the big news about the Ontological-Hysteric Theater leaving St. Mark’s Church — and the Incubator taking over.

At CultureFuture, the subject is a three-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian situation, pivoting off what a certain theater blogger wrote about it, since said blogger with blather about anything as long as people pay attention to him. I happen to like these details — it’s a dose of tough love, when you think about it:

…If Gaza and the West Bank are administered separately, then Israel should propose a good-faith peace negotiation with the Palestinian Authority that treats Gaza as a separate entity. That means a settlement freeze, withdrawal to 1967-borders-or-similar (in the West bank), tearing down the West Bank Barrier, and Jerusalem as a joint capital on the table. …I don’t know if Israel needs to give up the right-of-return (although it can’t keep the question completely closed before negotiations begin), but at the very least it needs to create some sort of compensation system.

As peace progresses, Hamas should regularly be given the option of laying down arms and conducting a referendum on whether or not to rejoin the West Bank as a unified state. If Gaza chooses to join the peace process as a separate entity from the West Bank, let them; so long as they are peaceful, there is no need to broker a unity government between them and Fatah. This removes the fear from Hamas that if they join the peace process, they will be forced to concede power to Fatah.

From the people of Gaza’s perspective, they can watch the West Bank. If the West Bank achieves meaningful concessions from Israel, gets some level of autonomy, economic growth, territorial integrity, and even some of the big dreams like shared control of Jerusalem, than Hamas’ argument that Israel is operating in bad faith will be seriously eroded, and Gazans may start to realize that they can join the process, and Hamas’ support will be eroded as well. Gaza will turn the tide of extremism, and start to follow the path of non-violence.

In addition, there is more discussion over what Scott Walters is writing about when it comes to students and what they think and needing fame and abusive internships and whatever crosses his mind at that moment, no doubt because such crossing with alter the course of western civilization as we know it. There is also a little discussion of the Pulitzer mess (which we at the CFR have investigated and opined on more fully here) that does not rely on Scott Walters’ genius; a take-down of CREDO mobile (in all seriousness, now that’s good blog reporting — I didn’t know much of that); some affirmation of the meme that Nick Clegg won the debate among the potential British prime ministers; an analysis of possible Supreme Court nominees; and how to do a great job torpedoing your brand.

At Daily Plays, Kristen Palmer continues reading — of late, Bruce Norris’ The Pain and the Itch.

At DavidMixner.com, David Mixner offers coverage of how the LGBT movement rocked Hollywood and how Texas governor-bot Rick Perry appears to be channeling the 43rd president, which is rather like a zombie imitating a zombie, isn’t it? Mixner also touted Secretary of State Hilary Clinton for the Supreme Court (Bill Clinton thinks not, and includes himself, naturally!); listed the most 20 powerful lesbians in American politics; questions whether that prevaricating Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, John Roberts, and his cohorts will squash LGBT legislation in the land (there will be violence if that happens, mark my words); a new concept for mosque tower, in Turkey; and a mixed 2010 election forecast for the Democrats.

But my favorite of the week was this YouTube video of a Glee flash mob in Seattle:

That, my fellow citizens, is America.

At D.C. Theatre Scene, the ongoing tsunami of reviews include a revival of The Liar; a revival of The Mikado; a revival of The Last Five Years; a production of [title of show]; a revival of Fiddler on the Roof; and — most interesting — Paul Scott Goodman’s Son of a Stand Up Comedian. And from New York: Richard Seff’s review of La Cage aux Folles.

At Dilettante, the wonderful wavelength of monologuist Mike Daisey is a must-read — especially a photograph of Darty Vader at McDonalds.

At Dog Days, there will be an update soon.

At Doric Wilson, the legendary Doric Wilson will update soon.

At EcoTheater, no posts since September 2009.

At Everything I Know I Learned From Musicals, my friend and colleague Chris Caggiano admits that the new Broadway musical Million Dollar Quartet isn’t his cup of tea — which is to say that perhaps we’re all attending theater far oolong for our own good. (Sorry, I’m always with a constant comment.) He also reviews Anyone Can Whistle at Encores and pronounces it the best tuner he’s ever seen in that series; and reviews Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson at the Public Theater, which the critical community has been in a state of orgasm over; Caggiano lavishes praise on the revival of La Cage aux Folles on Broadway, too, and includes a spoiler at the end that gives new meaning to the phrase “kiss and tell.”

At Extra Criticum, Andrew Altenberg considers the seven stages of Lost; David Licata’s list of key films (read this to learn the context); and Altenberg bids Ugly Betty farewell.

At the blog of the Flux Theatre Ensemble, playwright August Schulenberg weighed on a matter involving Time Out Theatre Critic David Cote, plus more interviews with Flux artists.

At Foreign Policy in Focus, a project of the Institute for Policy Studies, there is debate on whether the U.S. should stay in Afghanistan or leave; there’s also the question of whether the U.S. should vacate Japan, specifically the base at Okinawa. A new climate policy could be coming soon and a new anti-nuclear movement is called for.

At Fractured Atlas Blog, the organization has moved! There is also a profile of the Arts Council of Greater New Haven and a fiscal sponsorship information session scheduled for Philadelphia for early May. Also, Ciara Pressler exhorts any person or business “preparing to sell a product, service, show, or yourself…[to start] identifying your strategy. Immediately after you develop your product, strategy shapes what actions you will take to capture the attention of those who will ultimately attend, buy, pay, subscribe; there is a huge list of 115 approved projects from 21 states (with links!); and an interview with featured member Stephen Van Vuuren, who talks about his film, Outside In.

At Fragments (I Can Have Oodles of Charm When I Want To), the oodle-with-the-noodle Monica Reida (who is not following me on Twitter for some reason, though I’m following her) is taking a sabbatical, but offered the real schedule of Theater Cedar Rapids for everyone’s delectation, as opposed to the one she published on April Fool’s Day.

At Gratuitous Violins, Esther gives her take on the drama Pulitzer drama and then advances a unique idea:

…if the goal is to reward excellence in dramatic writing, preferably on an American subject, maybe it’s time to expand the definition. Let’s open the Pulitzer Prize to screenplays written for movies and television in addition to plays written for the stage.

Okay, I’m being a bit provocative here. I realize it’s not likely to happen. Screenplays aren’t generally read for their literary value. They’re sometimes group efforts rather than the work of a single individual. And there’s value in promoting playwriting as an American art form.

But American culture has changed since 1917. In a given year, it’s possible the finest dramatic writing may appear not on stage but on television or at the movies.

And there is a review of A Bronx Tale!

At Interchanging Idioms, Chip Michael reports on Yuja Wang’s Transformation CD; Bryn Terfel’s new Bad Boys CD; a Pulitzer prize going to composer Jennifer Higdon; muslim extremists trying to stop the music in Somalia; Michael Berkowitz stepping in for Damon Gupton as conductor in the BSO SuperPops’ Motown tribute, Apr. 22-25; the great Terry Gilliam is tapped to direct Berlioz’s The Damnation of Faust for the English National Opera next year; the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra announces its third annual “O, Say Can You Sing?” contest; a summary of upcoming Colorado Symphony Orchestra concerts; and a very good essay: “Why Do Some Contemporary Composers Want to Reinvent the Wheel?”

At Jamespeak, James Comtois’ wonderfully wry series of posts about self-producing continues — with a new post called “Advertise, Advertise, Advertise…,” which is actually a commentary on some other posts on, well, advertising, but via Facebook and postcards and other scary old-media instruments.

At Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York, arguably Gotham’s best and snarkiest blog devoted to what is lost when the cause of historic preservation is utterly for naught, catches up with the very dead Schwartz Funeral Home. A sad post on the loss of historic graffiti is on the site as well, plus what Marc Jacobs is apparently destroying, or at least trying to remake, in the over-luxurified West Village, and coverage of the Anarchist Book Fair (isn’t that self-contradicting?) and lots of everyday chatter. Also: another diner turned into an awful hipster bar.

At Just Shows to Go You, frenemy Patrick Lee reviews The 39 Steps.

At Ken Davenport’s The Producer’s Perspective, Ken Davenport wants everyone to know what a director does after the opening (not collect the check until the producer pulls the plug?). There is also the expected gushing over the musical Next to Normal winning the Pulitzer prize (commercial producers = taste?); a call for more show doctors that echoes a similar call in the New York Post (if commercial producers did their job, wouldn’t the work already be in good shape?); and a think piece on destination advertising, reflected through the lens of the New York theater.

At Lies Like Truth, the amazing Chloe Veltman offers a mixed-to-positive review of San Francisco’s Cutting Ball Theater Company’s production of Marcus Gardley’s …and Jesus Moonwalks the Mississippi and a little bit about the museums in Charlotte, NC.

At Life Upon the Sacred Stage, Retta Blaney’s spiritually uplifting blog, Blaney raves about The Scottsboro Boys, the musical playing at Off-Broadway’s Vineyard Theater; plugs the Public Theater’s Shakespeare Salon; celebrates a half century of The Fantasticks; suggests that The Addams Family “should have been assigned to an early grave”; and also suggests that Million Dollar Quartet, also playing on Broadway, has more like a quarter-million-dollar appeal.

At Mae West, there is so much West information that you’ll never look east again.

At Me2Ism, Donald Butchko says that the Joe Iconis tuner, Bloodsong of Love, makes his heart go pitty-pat. I love the way he puts it:

“Schadenfraude,” aside from being a delightful number from Avenue Q, is a word that falls into a distinct linguistic category of “untranslatables” — words that exist in one language which have no analogue in another. I wish there were a untranslatable meaning “that unique and special joy and sense of discovery upon watching a truly exciting new musical.” It is difficult to define this word beyond that rudimentary definition, other than to say it falls under the category of “you know it when you see it”. In recent memory, this would would, in my case, apply to my viewings of Passing Strange, In the Heights and Next to Normal. And now I can whole-heartedly add Bloodsong of Love to the list.

At Michael Kaiser’s blog, Kaiser, who is President of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, discusses the annual symposium for arts organizations of color.

At Mission Paradox, Adam Thurman reminds everyone that there are a lot of things arts folks can’t control:

Every time an actor walks on the stage, a dancer prepares, the author finishes the last word in her book, or the visual art is finished, the work immediately enters a world where anything can happen.

The public may love it, hate it, or be somewhere in between.

The critics may pan it, praise it, or ignore it entirely.

…You can make sure your marketing is targeted properly. You can make sure your fundraising message is compelling and distinct. Those are the things in your hands.

Thurman also demystifies what really drives word of mouth; what the difference is between adding “more” and adding “value”; and the myth of “do something” — and we’re not going to elaborate further. Very smart stuff. Read it. Oh, and also read Thurman’s take on Starbucks’ take on social media. Good conversation starter.

At Modern Fabulousity, here’s an Idina Menzel plug for you. And raising fears about what the state of Georgia is about to do to the arts.

At Moxie the Maven, Moxie the Maven will update soon.

At New Jersey Arts Blog, an update will appear soon.

At Nonprofit Law Blog, Gene Takagi offers a preview of the ReVisioning Value Conference, coming up on Apr. 26 and 27, and, of course, his excellent tweets of the week.

At Noticing New York, no new activity since February.

At NYC Performing Arts Spaces, the upcoming community forum on the Ohio Theatre is touted.

At the blog of New York State Assembly Member Micah Kellner, there is discussion of a jointly signed letter to President Obama regarding the security of Israel and the New York State Police — if legislation goes through — could at last have some citizen-led oversight.

At Off-Stage Right, the invaluable and indefatigable Jodi Schoenbrun Carter will post updates soon.

At On Chicago Theatre, the ever-on Zev Valancy is on the drama Pulitzer drama (where’s the analysis, baby?); a very fun Q&A with a film blogger of note; and his review of The Literati, which sounds very glitterati.

At On Theatre and Politics, Matt Freeman is shocked by what it costs to produce a play at the Public Theater (and why isn’t anyone thoroughly questioning that number — isn’t it a nonprofit with tax return open to public view?), and helps to spread the word about the vacating Ontological-Hysteric Theater from St. Mark’s Church, where it has been in residence since the week before the Spanish Inquisition.

At One Producer in the City, Michael Roderick talks up Kevin Daum’s very inspiring book Roar, which is quickly going to become a must for arts marketers, and permits everyone to realize if you don’t attend the community forum on the Ohio Theater, can you really say you’re part of the solution?

At Painting Air, Kat will update soon.

At Parabasis, Isaac Butler raises unearned self-righteousness to a new level nearly every day.

At Pataphysical Science, Linda is all over Joe Iconis’ Bloodsong of Love.

At the Playwrights Foundation blog, there is an interview with Tanya Shaffer.

At Reflections in the Light, the wonderfully industrious Lauren Yarger reviews Cirque du Soleil’s Ovo, Irish Rep’s revival of Shaw’s Candida (oh, it can’t be that nothing happens…darling!) and The Addams Family, which brings us to the slam-dunk smack-down of the week:

It’s like doing a musical version of Star Wars and forgetting to have someone say “May the force be with you.”

At Ryan J. Davis Blogs, prep for the Broadway Beauty Pageant (directed by Davis) continues apace.

At Sasha Dichter’s Blog, Sasha Dichter rails against customer service letters that read like customer service letters (attention, marketers) and offers some simple but enduring lessons regarding what school teaches us.

At smARts & Culture, Mary Ann Devine offers this week’s cultural clip service.

At Stage Grade, there is a grade to every stage. I’d say more, but Doug Rand and Jonathan Rand used to be kind to me. Oh, well. Never saw that coming.

At Stage Rush, Jesse North reviews Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson and a performance of At This Performance!

At StageBuzz, the intrepid Byrne Harrison posts a Q&A with the artistic director of At Hand Theatre Company, for which the Broadway Recycled fundraiser is benefiting. And a plug, too, for the Broadway Beauty Pageant.

At Steve On Broadway, my friend and colleague Steve Loucks hasn’t posted since Feb. 15. What up? (Although if you follow Steve’s tweet, you’ll know what he’s up to.)

At Storefront Rebellion, Kris Vire will post again soon.

At TACT (Theater Arts Curriculum Transformation), Scott Walters’ windbaggery attacks the bestowing of a drama Pulitzer to Next to Normal (I didn’t agree either, but for God’s sake, does the guy actually see any theater?) and then actually writes something valuable — a post called “Theatre Curriculum Based on Entrepreneurial Model,” which, I dare say, is a must read. The last graph should persuade you to read the full piece:

In the over-saturated market of the arts, the one who learns to produce their own work will be the artist that creates longevity. One must create original professional opportunities instead of waiting by the phone hoping they will be the artists chosen over thousands that applied. Artists must stop presenting themselves as products to be bought and as entrepreneurs who take it upon themselves to have a vision and work towards making that vision a reality.

At Tactical Philanthropy, Sean Stannard-Stockton begins a massive multi-participant-based blogging effort in honor of the Grantmakers for Effective Organization conference that continues here, here, here, here, here, here and here. Also: here and here. Meantime, Philip Hayes-St. Clair writes about a nonprofit taking over a corporation in Australia — an interesting discussion if you’re interested in unconventional business models, to be sure. And Stannard-Stockton talks about “Soft Power” in Philanthropy.

At Tarhearted, Joshua Conkel provides some personal life updates (and congrats from the CFR on having Milk Milk Lemonade published!), plus how to watch Pope Benedict XVI — a.k.a. Pope Nazi Pedobear — age.

At Technology and the Arts, Amelia Northrup tied together technology with arts advocacy — and yes, it is easier than building a music-making robot.

At That Sounds Cool, Aaron Riccio reviews The Realm and Bloodsong of Love; delivers a think piece on the function of the critic-blogger (short, but a smart read as ever); and gets all devilish reviewing 666.

At The David Desk, David Sheward has designs on episode 13 of Project Runway 7 and episode 9 of Amazing Race 16 (nice headline, David).

At The DJF, Donell James Foreman is headed home — for vacation.

At The Fortress of Jason Grote, Jason Grote will update soon.

At The Halcyon Theatre, Jennifer Adams proclaims herself a theater-o-holic and we here at the CFR, for one, heart such sentiments.

At The Hub Review, Thomas Garvey, Boston’s best arts blogger and a contributor to the Clyde Fitch Report, covers Sir Roger Norrington receiving an honorary doctorate from the New England Conservatory between conducting performances of Beethoven’s Fourth and Sixth symphonies. Also: Garvey smacks down Lisa Timmel, Director of New Work at the Huntington Theatre Company, and takes a swipe at a certain blogger with a wildly overindulged sense of self-importance. And when Garvey takes Timmel to task for using language not unfamiliar to those of the Nazi ideology, whaddaya know — she backtracks! His review of Mark Doherty’s Trad is well worth a read, too.

At The Mirror Up to Nature, Art Hennessey will update soon.

At The Playgoer, Garrett Eisler provides names and links for the Pulitzer board — who will email these people about the drama over Next to Normal? We dare y’all to have the guts. He also adds to the drama Pulitzer drama here. There is also a nice roundup.

At The Rob Kozlowski Chicago Theater and Vintage Film Medicine Show, Rob Kozlowski also weighs in on the drama Pulitzer drama, but with some sass and bite, which most of the other parrots are unwilling or unable to bring themselves to do. There are also the season announcements for the Lifeline Theatre and the Porchlight Theatre.

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At The Wicked Stage, the CFR’s wicked frenemy Rob Weinert-Kendt remains a wicked frenemy.

At Theatre Aficionado at Large, Kevin Daly reviews the Encores’ revival of Anyone Can Whistle (that photo of Donna Murphy is quickly becoming iconic, methinks); plus commentary on two news items about musicals (shouldn’t they make Waterworld a musical first?); and offers an insightful reconsideration of Irma La Douce.

At Theatreforte, the 2am Theatre website — or at least one provocative discussion on it — gets a serious head-slam. Will the 2am smarties respond?

At Theatre Ideas, Scott Walters tells everyone to visit his new blog. We “Sieg Heil” and do so, fearing assassination otherwise.

At Theatre North Carolina, the Raleigh Little Theatre announces its 2010-11 season; there is Lauren Kennedy and Pamela Myers to star in the Flat Rock Playhouse revival of Steel Magnolias; and something-something-something Clay Aiken.

At Tynan’s Anger, Ethan Stanislawski covers more about the Pulitzer prizes than just the drama Pulitzer drama, and it’s pretty good commentary at that. Plus there’s a guide to the Broadway season — what has already opened, how good the shows were, and what is still to come.

At Visible Soul, Zack Calhoon questions the use of blackouts — from an audience-experience point of view — in the play he’s currently rehearsing.

At What’s Good / What Blows in New York Theatre, Rocco gives Vampire Cowboys Theatre Company love — but it’s tough love, and advises the troupe to “up the ante” with their next show.

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http://sashadichter.wordpress.com/2010/03/30/if-free-is-the-new-black/